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Hi, my name is Bob.

I'm a National Park Service hydrologist at Big Cypress National Preserve who works in collaboration with Florida Gulf Coast University, the Big Cypress Basin arm of the South Florida Water Management District, and the multi-agency Big Cypress Watersheds Team.

Go Hydrology! is your daily passport into the inner realm of south Florida's water cycle and interconnected watersheds -- a narrative voice into the watery wilderness of aquatic south Florida.

I make no claim to knowing everything, just enough worth sharing.



The Blog

The blog part of Go Hydrology! is written around a dozen or so themes (or topics) as described below.   

Rain Or Shine Report Come rain or shine, this is the weekly rainfall report ... or as is often the case in sunny Florida -- the lack thereof.







Vortex Into Water Data Get ready to high dive into a decades deep reservoir of water data.  Watch out for the whirlpool!  






It's Not the Heat, it's the humidity, right?  This page explores when and if summer ever actually ends in Florida, and if so, whether or not we have a winter.







Tales of the Water Cycle Every watershed has its yarns and legends, many of which are fun ... and some of which are actually true!






Sailing Uncharted Waters South Florida's peculiar water cycle is sometimes best understood by turning our hydrologic lens "outward" to other parts of Florida and "up continent."






Native Plant Photos The watershed is full of this amazing green stuff that a fellow botanist informed me were plants.  This page features photographs about their interaction with the water cycle.






Ghosts of Watersheds Past The people may be gone and the places may have changed, but these signs still stand, silently, to tell their story.






Water In Motion  The sound and sight of moving water is unmistakable. A water journal without it wouldn't be the same, not to mention just downright dry.






Ripple on Still Water There's lots to see in the swamps, and even more to photograph, both before and after.





Ye Olde Mudderland Everyone comes from somewhere, which in my case was "somewhere else,"  namely Maryland, or as I like to call it -- The Mudderland.






Tidal Undulations You can't live in Florida without wondering about the salty stuff at lands end. I'm not a marine biologist, but I frequently visit our local beaches and find lots to see.






Swampulator Have you ever been in the middle of the swamps and wondered how many Fenway Parks it would fill up? Me too!  The Swampulator has all the buttons that a normal calculator lacks, but always wish it had.




Going with the Flow Water has a mind of its own, but it also always seems to know where its going. These posts try to do just that.





Safety Message Water can take a turn to the dangerous if you are not cautious. Remember to stay well hydrated and treat water and wildlife with respect in all its shapes and sizes.






Other Go Hydrology! Features

Go Hydrology! is more than just a blog.

It's also contains a slew of living maps and breathing hydrographs that bring the water to your fingertips. Simply click on the the Tabs at the top of the page (or the images below) to view them.

You'll be a watershed expert in no time flat!





The Mobile tab is specially coded to allow you to look at hydrologic data from the comfort of your smart phone, whether in the office or in the field.





The forecast tab features live radar, rainfall maps for the past 6-hr and 24-hr rainfall maps, animated satellite images, and the hurricane outlook.





The Rain Tab features Florida and national rainfall maps for the past 30 days, a look at the drought index, animated maps of annual precipitation patterns, and historical rain charts for south Florida.





The Air Tab features current temperature and heat index maps for the nation, daily high and low temperature maps for Florida, an "Up Peninsular" temperature comparison (for all you snow birds), and in-depth temperature charts for Naples, Fla.




The Surf Tab features a current wave height map for Florida, tide information, satellite imagery of the tropics, and sea surface temperature maps.




The Swamp Tab features weekly-updated hydrographs for Big Cypress Swamp, animated images of the water cycle at work in the swamp, and a time line.




The Glades Tab features weekly-updated hydrographs for the Everglades, photographs, animated images of the water cycle at work in the glades, and a time line.




The Lake Tab features weekly-updated hydrographs for Lake Okeechobee and downstream estuaries, representative photographs, an animated images of the water cycle at work within the levee, a red tide report, and a time line.





The News Tab features water news from around the state of Florida, organized by topic.




The Bottom of the Blog features maps of today's "probably precipitation outlook" and "air temperature" for the nation, links to other Florida nature blogs, a few national weather blogs, plus a handy list of Florida water and weather links.









Feel free  to contact me if you would like more information, or to be added to the journal's weekly mailing list. Otherwise, have fun reading -- and remember -- always be good to your watershed!

Sincerely,

Robert V. Sobczak
robert_sobczak@nps.gov
239-695-1151