Feb 6, 2012

Audio hydrograph?

High or low the Everglades always sounds the same.

That's because there aren't any rapids.

Who needs a hydrograph when you
can just listen to the flow rate, instead?

Compare that to the stream I grew up with when I was a kid.

It makes a different noise depending on how high or low it is on the hydrograph. For example, earlier this fall its famous run of rapids rose into the top of its high decibel range, i.e. deafening, as a result of Hurricane Irene. Had the same storm hit Florida, however, the sheetflow it formed would have been silent instead.


Such high water in autumn is unusual for continental streams.

Early fall is a time when Deer Creek usually enters its annual ebb as indicated by the tell-tale clamoring or rustling sound at its rapid run, or in cases of extreme drought, a meekly gurgling or even just whispering.

Clamorous

But winter and spring, continental rivers come alive.

If you go there now you can hear it roar.

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